Friday, September 15, 2006

My favorite skin doctor

The dermatologist who helped clear up my skin in my early 20s, tracing the cause to the iodine in Centrum vitamins, if you can believe it, and prescribing AlphaHydroxy lotion, got so busted by Dateline NBC.

No, not for being a child predator.

Dateline went undercover to make an infomercial about a bogus product called "Moisturol," which was nothing more than a capsule filled with Nestle Quik. (Product placement for Nestle? Why?)

"The producer found a doctor, who agreed to a $5,000 fee to endorse our pill without seeing clinical studies or even testing it before she spoke."

Ooh, that looks really bad. Granted the video didn't show what she actually said about Moisturol after they showed her a list of fake ingredients, so it's possible that all she said was that ingesting those ingredients could be beneficial.

And has anyone proven that ingesting capsules of dry Nestle Quik is not good for your complexion?

I have some firsthand experience with the fraud of infomercials, except mine wasn't as bad as the Moisturol situation where they were deliberately duplicitous about the product contents. At least I didn't think so at the time.

I "auditioned" for an infomericial, as an "actress." They gave me three week's worth of Slim Patch cream and told me to try it. It was supposed to curb hunger and was "homeopathic." They got me on camera saying that it was great and I loved that it was all natural and when I used it, I didn't have the urge to snack. Sad for me, they printed my full name on the screen and ran the thing nationwide. Other people claimed to have lost pounds and inches, but they didn't pressure me to lie. 'Course I wanted them to use me (for some reason), so I may have embellished.

I didn't get $5,000 though. I got $75. And free samples of Slim Patch.

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